Power Armour

Power armour is heavy plating that is too bulky and heavy to be worn normally, but can be attached to mechanised power armour frames that bear the load. Power armour frames are also equipped with cushioning and other functions that protect the wearer from falls and other kinds of heavy impacts.

Power armour pieces and frames have no cost, as they are too rare and valuable to be available for purchase.

Like regular armour, power armour is divided up into six slots, and it is possible to wear an imcomplete or piecemeal suit of power armour on a frame.

A character can enter a power armour frame while wearing light or medium armour, but not heavy armour. A helmet can be worn with a power armour frame; however, while wearing a helmet, a creature cannot put on a power armour helmet.

Power armour frames have the following effects when worn:

  • The features of worn armour are ignored while wearing one or more pieces of power armour on their frame. While power armour pieces on the frame have temporary hit points, the wearer’s AC is 10 + Dex mod.
  • Increase the wearer’s effective Strength score by +4, and their Strength score can exceed 20 while wearing a frame.
  • The character’s maximum carrying capacity and lift/drag limits are doubled.
  • The wearer cannot benefit from their Dexterity bonus, but also doesn’t apply their Dexterity penalty.
  • The wearer has resistance to bludgeoning damage from falling or from something falling onto the wearer.
  • The wearer’s unarmed attacks deal 1d4 damage.
Power Armour
Power Armour Hit Points Weight Special Properties
Raider Power Armour
Arm Piece 15 16 lb.
Leg Piece 15 16 lb.
Chest Piece 45 22 lb.
Helmet 15 14 lb.
T-45 Power Armour
Arm Piece 20 15 lb. Sealed
Leg Piece 20 15 lb. Sealed
Chest Piece 60 20 lb. Sealed
Helmet 20 12 lb. Sealed
T-51 Power Armour
Arm Piece 25 15 lb. Sealed
Leg Piece 25 15 lb. Sealed
Chest Piece 75 20 lb. Sealed
Helmet 25 12 lb. Sealed
T-60 Power Armour
Arm Piece 30 15 lb. Sealed
Leg Piece 30 15 lb. Sealed
Chest Piece 90 20 lb. Sealed
Helmet 30 12 lb. Sealed
X-01 Power Armour
Arm Piece 35 15 lb. Sealed
Leg Piece 35 15 lb. Sealed
Chest Piece 105 20 lb. Sealed
Helmet 35 12 lb. Sealed
Enclave Advanced Power Armour Mk I
Arm Piece 40 18 lb. Sealed
Leg Piece 40 18 lb. Sealed
Chest Piece 120 26 lb. Sealed
Helmet 40 15 lb. Sealed
Enclave Advanced Power Armour Mk II
Arm Piece 45 18 lb. Sealed
Leg Piece 45 18 lb. Sealed
Chest Piece 135 26 lb. Sealed
Helmet 45 15 lb. Sealed

In addition to the features of the frame, power armour has the following statistics.

Hit Points. Each piece of power armour has a pool of hit points. When the wearer takes damage, their power armour loses its hit points first in the following order:

  • Arms (starting with whichever has the least hit points if applicable, otherwise determined at random with a d6 roll where 1-3 means left and 4-6 means right).
  • Legs (starting with whichever has the least hit points if applicable, otherwise determined at random with a d6 roll where 1-3 means left and 4-6 means right).
  • Chest.
  • Helmet.

Once a piece of power armour has lost all of its hit points, it is heavily damaged and may be destroyed. Roll 1d6.

  • 1-2. The piece is damaged beyond hope of repair. The piece is no longer functional, but may be kept as salvage with a worth equal to its weight.
  • 3-4. The piece becomes defective. (see Substandard Power Armour below).
  • 5-6. The piece doesn't suffer a negative condition and may be repaired up to its normal maximum Hit Points.

If the piece is defective or busted the above d6 results no longer apply. See the alternative results for the condition in question in the Substandard Power Armour section below.

Damage remaining after a piece loses all its hit points is carried over to the next piece or to the wearer.

Critical Hits and Power Armour

When a character rolls a critical hit against a power-armoured target and one or more of the target's power armour pieces has no hit points remaining or the target is not wearing power armour in that location, the attacker may choose to bypass the power armour and deal damage directly to the target.

Radiation Damage and Power Armour

Radiation bypasses power armour entirely, though sealed suits and those with the lead lining modification offer some measure of protection. Radiation damage is dealt directly to the wearer's hit points.

Variant: Random Damage Distribution

The default rules assume that power armour is hit in a specific order: arms, legs, chest, then helmet, prioritising the piece with the fewest hit points remaining in the case of arms and legs. This is intended to simplify the power armour rules. If your group doesn't mind adding an additional level of complexity, the GM can rule that damage is dealt the power armour randomly.

Whenever a character takes damage while wearing power armour and the attack is not a critical, the defender rolls a d20:

  • 1-2. Helmet
  • 3-8. Chest
  • 9-11. Left Arm
  • 12-14. Right Arm
  • 15-17. Left Leg
  • 18-20. Right Leg

On a critical hit, the defender doesn't roll. Instead, the attacker may choose the result. If they choose a location piece with no hit points remaining or where no power armour is worn, the attacker bypasses the power armour and deal damage directly to the target.

When the defender rolls a result that has no hit points remaining or where no power armour is worn, the roll is treated as though it were the next highest result for which the defender has a functioning piece of power armour. For instance, in the event that a character's power armour chest and left arm have zero hit points and they roll a 4 to determine a hit location, their right arm is the piece that takes the damage.

Surplus damage carries over to a nearby piece. Apply the following rules of priority, one at a time, to determine which piece takes the surplus damage.

  • Prioritise pieces that are adjacent. When a leg is reduced to zero hit points the surplus damage might carry over to the other leg or chest. Surplus damage to an arm or helmet carries over to the chest. Surplus damage to the chest could carry over to any other piece of power armour. If there is no adjacent piece, the surplus could carry over to any remaining piece of armour.
  • When multiple pieces are adjacent, prioritise the piece with the least current hit points.
  • When multiple pieces are adjacent and have the same number of hit points, prioritise arms over legs, legs over the chest, and the chest over the helmet.
  • When there are multiple pieces of the same slot (arms or legs) which are adjacent and have the same number of hit points, make a 1d6 roll where 1-3 means left and 4-6 means right.

Repairing Power Armour

The typical repair cost of a piece of power armour in caps or salvage is equal to half the difference between its current hit points and its hit point maximum (rounded up). If a piece has been reduced to zero hit points, the damage is extensive enough that the cost is doubled and is equal to the piece's hit point maximum. Fully repairing power armour with a substandard condition involves additional costs (see below).

Regardless of how little damage there is to repair, NPC mechanics usually charge an additional flat fee for their time (which varies from mechanic to mechanic but is usually at least 5 caps), so while it might be best to keep power armour in a constant state of good repair, if you can't do the work yourself it is generally more cost efficient to wait until substantial damage is done and have fewer trips to the town mechanic.

Substandard Power Armour

NPCs can be equipped with substandard power armour to represent existing damage or an overall state of disrepair. For instance, Enclave Trainees are equipped with older sets that are faulty enough that they are no longer worth maintaining to the standard required to protect a fully-trained Enclave soldier.

Substandard power armour can also be awarded as a quest reward at low to mid levels or in cases where you want to carefully control the impact of the effective hit point buffer power armour grants to its wearer. Whether or not the substandard power armour is intended as a one-off and temporary reward or can be repaired is up to you. Repairing the armour back to a working standard may be the subject of a quest in and of itself.

When first found, individual pieces or full sets of power armour can have one of two conditions: defective or busted. Power armour can also gain these conditions through damage.

Defective Power Armour

A piece of defective power armour has the following properties:

  • Divide the Hit Points of any piece of defective armour by 2, rounding down. The power armour piece can be repaired up to this new total, but not to full.
  • When reduced to zero hit points, a piece of defective power armour is destroyed on a roll of 1-3, gains the busted condition on a roll of 4-5, or remains defective on a 6.

Defective armour can be fixed with rare and expensive parts costing two times the damage to be repaired in caps or salvage, and a DC 15 Intelligence (Mechanic's Tools) check. On a failed check, the defective armour isn't repaired and one quarter (rounded up) of the repair costs are lost due to damage to the components.

Busted Power Armour

A piece of busted power armour has the following properties:

  • Divide the Hit Points of any piece of broken-down power armour by 4, rounding down. The power armour piece can be repaired up to this new total, but not to full.
  • When reduced to zero hit points, a piece of busted power armour is destroyed on a roll of 1-4 or remains busted on a 5-6.
  • Should the piece be restored to full after its faults have been repaired (see below), the maximum Hit Points of the piece (assuming it is restored to full) is permanently reduced by 5. Should a piece of power armour become busted multiple times, this permanent damage reduction is cumulative.

Busted power armour can be fixed with rare and expensive parts costing four times the damage to be repaired in caps or salvage, and a DC 20 Intelligence (Mechanic's Tools) check. On a failed check, the defective armour isn't repaired and one quarter (rounded up) of the repair costs are lost due to damage to the components.

Busted power armour can also be improved up to defective, in which case the Intelligence (Mechanic's Tools) check is only DC 15.

Power Armour Special Properties

Sealed. If a characters wears power armour with the sealed property on each of the six body locations, the atmospheric oxygen-filters in its helmet can be temporarily shut down allowing the suit to become air and water-tight. The wearer can breathe normally underwater, in gas, or in other similar conditions for as long as the remaining internal air lasts (typically 5 minutes). Sealed power armour also increases a character's Rad Resist score by 5. Should one or more pieces of the power armour suit be reduced to zero hit points or removed, the wearer loses the benefits of the sealed special property.

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